Who will come to your bird feeder in 2075?

Birdfeeders

Birdfeeders

The distribution of birds in the United States today will probably look very different in 60 years as a result of climate, land use and land cover changes.

A new U.S. Geological Survey study predicts where 50 bird species will breed, feed and live in the conterminous U.S. by 2075. While some types of birds, like the Baird’s sparrow, will likely lose a significant amount of their current U.S. range, other ranges could nearly double. Human activity will drive many of these shifts. The study was published today in the journal PLOS ONE. Continue reading

Climate change alters cast of winter birds

A northern cardinal glides above a snowy landscape. “Birds have always been very good indicators of environmental change,” says UW-Madison wildlife biologist Benjamin Zuckerberg.    Photo: John Capella/Cornell Lab of Ornithology

A northern cardinal glides above a snowy landscape. “Birds have always been very good indicators of environmental change,” says UW-Madison wildlife biologist Benjamin Zuckerberg. Photo: John Capella/Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Over the past two decades, the resident communities of birds that attend eastern North America’s backyard bird feeders in winter have quietly been remade, most likely as a result of a warming climate.

Writing this week in the journal Global Change Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison wildlife biologists Benjamin Zuckerberg and Karine Princé document that once rare wintering bird species are now commonplace in the American Northeast.

Using more than two decades of data on 38 species of birds gathered by thousands of “citizen scientists” through the Cornell University Laboratory of Ornithology’s Project FeederWatch, the Wisconsin researchers show that birds typically found in more southerly regions are gradually pushing north, restructuring the communities of birds that spend their winters in northern latitudes. Continue reading

Audubon Releases Comprehensive Study On Climate Change Impact On Birds

If you like hearing the loon’s call at the lake or spotting ducks, you could be out of luck in the near future. In a first-of-its-kind study, Audubon has released a comprehensive study of bird species throughout Alaska, Canada and the continental U.S. assessing fundamental climate needs for each species to survive. It found several iconic species at risk in New York.

 Common Loon Credit Melody Lytle/Audubon Photography Awards


Common Loon
Credit Melody Lytle/Audubon Photography Awards

The Audubon Bird and Climate Report assesses climactic suitability, predicting a range of temperatures, precipitation, and seasonal changes that each species needs to survive. It uses predicted greenhouse gas emission scenarios to map each species’ new range as the climate changes.  It found 588 North American species at risk. 314 will lose more than 50 percent of their current climatic range by 2080. Continue reading

More Than Half Of U.S. Bird Species Threatened By Climate Change

 A Baltimore oriole perches near apple blossoms in Mendota Heights, Minn.


A Baltimore oriole perches near apple blossoms in Mendota Heights, Minn.

People in Maryland love their Baltimore orioles — so much so that their Major League Baseball team bears the name of the migrating bird. Yet, by 2080, there may not be any orioles left in Maryland. They migrate each year and, according to a new report, could soon be forced to nest well north of the Mid-Atlantic state.

And the oriole is not alone. A seven-year study published Tuesday by the National Audubon Society warns that the migratory routes and habitats of more than half of the birds in North America are now or soon will be threatened by climate change. Continue reading

Chemical Pollution and Climate Change Threatening 1,300 Species of Birds

 Queensland stakeholders welcome feds inquiry on Wild Rivers Act


Queensland stakeholders welcome feds inquiry on Wild Rivers Act

More than 1,300 species of birds are threatened with extinction, with chemical pollution and climate change two major culprits. Because of these and other dangers, the status of most of the endangered species is deteriorating, according to BirdLife International.

In the majority of cases, the blame lies with humans, with loss of habitat and chemical contamination of the environment posing a serious threat to birds. The destruction of wetlands, forests and plains has also diminished birds’ food supply, according to Environmental Health News. Continue reading

Exotic European birds to settle in UK as it gets warmer

 A bee eater Photo: Ian Reditt/Nationalt Trust


A bee eater Photo: Ian Reditt/Nationalt Trust

Rare birds that have not bred in the UK for decades have produced clutches of chicks, as experts predict the warm summers could mean more exotic European species will colonise Britain.

Four bee eater chicks have been born in the Isle of Wight, the first time the birds have bred for 12 years, while two black winged stilts have produced young successfully this year, the first time in almost 30 years.

Two rare glossy ibises, native to the South of France, also set up a nest and started to show signs of getting ready to breed in the UK – the only time this has happened since records began.

Continue reading